September 17, 2014

ardatli:

sciencefictionbaby:

this next trick is a little something i like to call “bulking out my bibliography with articles I barely looked at”

“Works Sighted”

(via silencewhippersnapper)

September 16, 2014
salparadisewasright:

estufar:

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 


I love this so much.

salparadisewasright:

estufar:

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 

I love this so much.

(via gingerhaze)

September 11, 2014

(Source: the-average-gatsby, via minimallywiththetimes)

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Filed under: 30 rock 
September 11, 2014
rhube:

nickjbarlow:

source

Yesssssss.

rhube:

nickjbarlow:

source

Yesssssss.

(via thepinakes)

September 9, 2014
*Tumblarian bat-signal*

scholardemic:

Working on what may turn into a fun little research project for class, looking for some info.

Does anyone out there know of any libraries that have digital comics in their collection? Specifically licensed content, such as you would access through ComiXology (looking at it as a parallel to e-books, and the issues relating to collection management).

Apologies if that’s incoherent, hit me up for more better wording.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

September 9, 2014

arlingtonvalib:

behindthebloom:

Dogs and humans alike are fans of SUPER SNIFFERS, a new picture book about service dogs who use their noses on the job.

This dog is way too cute.

(via thedanaash)

September 9, 2014
melissablock:

Maybe you know the feeling. Call it an apple awakening: the moment when you realize there are infinitely more delights to be found in the universe of apples than Red Delicious (meh), McIntosh (booooring and prone to mushiness), or Granny Smith (holding up well for her age, but a one-note standby.)
My first apple awakening came early on, growing up in apple country in upstate New York, when my family switched from McIntosh loyalists to devotees of the Macoun (crisper, more full of flavor) and never looked back.
But my true initiation came in my 20s, when I went apple-picking at an heirloom orchard in the Virginia countryside.  Revelation! Apples of every shape and size and color, from rosy peach to deepest purple, with fabulous names:  Black Twig. Newtown Pippin.  Esopus Spitzenberg (a favorite of Thomas Jefferson).  Each with history, and a taste to make you rethink the essence of appleness.  
So imagine my delight when the book “Apples of Uncommon Character” landed in my mailbox, a glorious compendium of “123 heirlooms, modern classics, and little-known wonders.”  Author and self-described apple geek Rowan Jacobsen does for apples what he did earlier for oysters: he captures in vivid language what makes the flavor of each type unique (with extraordinary photographs by Clare Barboza you want to bite into.) 
One apple makes Jacobsen “think of the aurora borealis, of green ribbons of cold fire swaying against the blackness.”  Another is “tart and snappy, with an acid tongue and a rustic coarseness. Picture a ruddy barmaid in some nineteenth-century Holland tavern.”
Say no more. It’s clearly time for an All Things Considered apple foray.  I’m off, with producer Viet Le, to Scott Farm in Dummerston, Vermont. We’ll meet up with Rowan Jacobsen and the orchard manager, Ezekiel Goodband, and talk heirloom apples.  Word from Zeke is that Ananas Reinette, Claygate Pearmain, Chenango Strawberry, and Opalescent are among the dozens of varieties that may be ready for picking (and tasting.)  We’ll bring you the story next week on ATC, and will post photos from our visit here along the way.  

Really craving apples now.

melissablock:

Maybe you know the feeling. Call it an apple awakening: the moment when you realize there are infinitely more delights to be found in the universe of apples than Red Delicious (meh), McIntosh (booooring and prone to mushiness), or Granny Smith (holding up well for her age, but a one-note standby.)

My first apple awakening came early on, growing up in apple country in upstate New York, when my family switched from McIntosh loyalists to devotees of the Macoun (crisper, more full of flavor) and never looked back.

But my true initiation came in my 20s, when I went apple-picking at an heirloom orchard in the Virginia countryside.  Revelation! Apples of every shape and size and color, from rosy peach to deepest purple, with fabulous names:  Black Twig. Newtown Pippin.  Esopus Spitzenberg (a favorite of Thomas Jefferson).  Each with history, and a taste to make you rethink the essence of appleness. 

So imagine my delight when the book “Apples of Uncommon Character” landed in my mailbox, a glorious compendium of “123 heirlooms, modern classics, and little-known wonders.”  Author and self-described apple geek Rowan Jacobsen does for apples what he did earlier for oysters: he captures in vivid language what makes the flavor of each type unique (with extraordinary photographs by Clare Barboza you want to bite into.)

One apple makes Jacobsen “think of the aurora borealis, of green ribbons of cold fire swaying against the blackness.”  Another is “tart and snappy, with an acid tongue and a rustic coarseness. Picture a ruddy barmaid in some nineteenth-century Holland tavern.”

Say no more. It’s clearly time for an All Things Considered apple foray.  I’m off, with producer Viet Le, to Scott Farm in Dummerston, Vermont. We’ll meet up with Rowan Jacobsen and the orchard manager, Ezekiel Goodband, and talk heirloom apples.  Word from Zeke is that Ananas Reinette, Claygate Pearmain, Chenango Strawberry, and Opalescent are among the dozens of varieties that may be ready for picking (and tasting.)  We’ll bring you the story next week on ATC, and will post photos from our visit here along the way.  

Really craving apples now.

(via npr)

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Filed under: apples fall npr 
September 5, 2014
WHO'S BACK TO LIBRARY SCHOOL?

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Baby librarians unite! You’re doing it!

(PS-You can be a baby librarian at any age.)

September 5, 2014

npr:

Before I went to Ferguson, Mo., to cover the aftermath of the Michael Brown shooting, a friend who had already been there reporting joked that he was certain that every person in the town had already been interviewed. And sure enough, the media crunch on was intense on West Florissant, the main boulevard that was the site of protests and clashes with the police in the wake of the shooting of Michael Brown.

During the middle of the workday, it sometimes seemed like there was a 1:1 ratio between protesters and members of the press. The demonstrators typically wouldn’t come out in full force until the day went on; folks were either at work or waiting out the brutal humidity. Later at night, the people on West Florissant would get younger and rowdier, and it was those folks who were at the center of the skirmishes with the police we all saw on television and on social media.

But Ferguson isn’t a very large town. All those flash bangs and tear gas canisters were going off just behind people’s homes or in front of their small businesses. It’s your typical American suburb, and in many ways, it still was, even with all the clamor going on. Photographer Eric Kayne and I walked around the neighborhood chatting with people while they worked or relaxed, enjoying the last few weeks of summer, even as their town had become the most recent locus for Our Ongoing National Conversation on Race.

Scenes From The Ferguson We Didn’t See On TV

Photo credit: Eric Kayne for NPR

(via minimallywiththetimes)

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Filed under: ferguson 
September 3, 2014
I was watching Destinos to work on my Spanish and the felt the need to share Raquel’s truly enormous shoulder pads.

I was watching Destinos to work on my Spanish and the felt the need to share Raquel’s truly enormous shoulder pads.

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Filed under: destinos 
September 1, 2014

theinnkeeperlibrarian:

lib-tech-in-the-tardis:

sizvideos:

Video

I suddenly had a vision of having to provide library assistance like this. I can’t tell if I would be more freaked out providing it like this, or if the patrons would….

(via katemacetak)

August 31, 2014

dogmobile:

Fall 2014 fashion: Scout’s ham costume from To Kill A Mockingbird

image

(via silencewhippersnapper)

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Filed under: fashion 
August 28, 2014

bookpatrol:

Minnesota: Land of 10,000 lakes and 1 floating library

There are lakes everywhere in Minnesota and now one of them has a floating library.

Thanks to Sarah Peters the contraption above is open for business on Cedar Lake in Minneapolis. Designed by Molly Reichert the 8 foot structure will hold upwards of 80 books for water travelers to peruse and check out.

Canoes, kayaks, paddle boards, skiffs, rowboats, or even inner tubes are invited to paddle up to the Library and browse the shelves from inside their watercraft. The library has both circulating and reference collections of artists’ books contributed by artists nationwide. A staff of friendly floating librarians facilitate the check out process and make reading suggestions

There are even drop off boxes on the shore to return the books.

About the project, Peters told the Minneapolis Star Tribune “Art books are not a widely known art form..And so there’s an element of delight and surprise. First of all, canoeing along and coming across a library. And then having it stocked with books that are totally unique. It’s like this double whammy of inventiveness. It can expand people’s ideas of what art is.”

True enough but it could also ruin a lot of those unique books. Granted one cannot enter the library but the confluence of books and water rarely ends well.

Perhaps a shore-based library by the landing dock could have achieved the goal of exposing people to the pleasures of book arts and artists books without  the high risk. But then again maybe the reward is in the risk.

Story at the Star Tribune: The land of 10,000 lakes now has a floating library 

Floating Library website

Flickr set of the Floating Library, 2013

h/t Shelf Awareness

(via libraryjournal)

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Filed under: libraries 
August 26, 2014
americanlibraryassoc:

Get some Chipotle noms for a good cause! dcpubliclibrary

americanlibraryassoc:

Get some Chipotle noms for a good cause! dcpubliclibrary

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Filed under: libraries dc chipotle 
August 26, 2014

We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, ‘You can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful, but not too successful. Otherwise you will threaten the man.’ Because I am female, I am expected to aspire to marriage. I am expected to make my life choices always keeping in mind that marriage is the most important. Now marriage can be a source of joy and love and mutual support. But why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage and we don’t teach boys the same? We raise girls to see each other as competitors – not for jobs or for accomplishments, which I think can be a good thing, but for the attention of men. We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are.

We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, ‘You can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful, but not too successful. Otherwise you will threaten the man.’ Because I am female, I am expected to aspire to marriage. I am expected to make my life choices always keeping in mind that marriage is the most important. Now marriage can be a source of joy and love and mutual support. But why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage and we don’t teach boys the same? We raise girls to see each other as competitors – not for jobs or for accomplishments, which I think can be a good thing, but for the attention of men. We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are.

(Source: donatellavevo, via housingworksbookstore)

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